Thursday, January 31, 2013

January OLW: CREATE-ing Anchor Charts

from Google Images
When I chose CREATE as my one little word, I knew that it would just add a spring in my step.  I had posted earlier on how CREATE-ing at home brought joy and comfort to my life.  The whole reason I chose "CREATE" was due to the realization that  I wanted to focus on bringing ideas, thoughts, possibilities, and seed ideas into existence...enjoying the process.

The other day, when I was envisioning an anchor chart for a lesson, I was reminded that the process of making an anchor chart should not only be a process, but that our focus should be about the process of making thinking visible.  I found myself going through a series of questions when visualizing what this chart might look like when we were done creating.

  • Will the chart remind my students of a "shared experience"?
  • Will the chart support the students in "thinking"and not just being told what to do? (Not just a set of directions)
  • Was the thinking on the chart grounded in a common text?
  • Will the chart make our thinking visible and promote a process of transferring to another reading experience? 
ANCHOR THIS...


The final product...a main idea anchor chart.  I decided to display the text (common text) and create our chart interactively (shared experience).  The post-its showed the thinking that it takes to determine the main idea (promoting a process) and records their responses (their thinking) while working through the concept.  If something is going to be posted in the classroom, I wanted my students to CREATE a chart that they would have ownership of and would spotlight our thinking together.  Remembering that reading is thinking, not completing a set of directions.
Use this to guide PLANNING your lesson/chart...















Check out more One Little Word reflections:
Maria
Erin








1 comment:

  1. Will the chart support the students in •"thinking"and not just being told what to do? (Not just a set of directions)
    •Promote a process of transferring to another reading experience?
    Love these two points! So many times we want our students to just perform! We forget that it all about the process of thinking and then being able to transfer this knowledge to another situation.

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