Sunday, July 14, 2013

Notice and Note...with whom?



I have now read Notice and Note...twice.  During my first read, the text was meeting my mind and awakening so many thoughts and experiences.  During my second read, I found myself thinking about all of the student novels I have read and trying to have a conversation (with myself) about certain signposts in certain books.  One line stood out like no other on page 12, "Now more than ever, reading seems to be a social act."  Whether it be words on paper or words on a screen, I realize more than ever that the demands of reading in each situation are different, but the social act is the same.  I could not stop thinking about, other than "turn and talk" or whole class read aloud, how to use these signposts in a more "social" action.  Here are some that come to mind:

1.  Two classrooms participate in the same whole class read aloud in their own classrooms, discovering signposts along the way.  At certain "rest stops", buddies from each class are formed to discuss the signposts.  Are the two classrooms finding the same responses?  The students take notes of their conversation, then report back to their classroom any new thinking or revised thinking from the buddy stop.
2.  Two book clubs in the same classroom read the same book, but meet only with their own group.  Then at certain "rest stops", a student from one book club meets with another book club and uses book club discussions to move conversation forward.  Are the two book clubs finding the same responses?  The students then report back to their book club any new thinking or revised thinking from the buddy stop.
3.  Two classrooms in different schools participate in the same whole class read aloud. At certain "rest stops", buddies from each class are formed to discuss the signposts in the media world (blogs, Skype, etc..).  Are the two classrooms in different schools finding the same signposts?  The students then reflect on how this social act triggered any new thinking.

In all of these social acts, the signposts act as text triggers.  These text triggers will support the students in using natural strategies, not forced ones.

Now I am going to read a student novel and look for the signposts myself.  Check out A Year of Reading...Mary Lee tried this with a book titled, Don't Feed the Boy.  I am thinking of trying it with Eye of the Storm by Kate Messner.

2 comments:

  1. This is one book that had not made in my TBR pile now two of you have written blogs that have hooked me. Great practical ideas for excellent conversations with purpose.

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    1. I am excited about how this book pushes all teachers and students to think beyond the text and not just the book itself. Let me know when you read it!

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